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COVID-19 updates

COVID-19 updates COVID-19 updates

Loans designed to keep people employed

Indiana Sen. Todd Young, R-Bloomington, joined Gov. Eric Holcomb for the COVID-19 update today (April 14). Young provided Hoosiers an update to the federal stimulus package known as the CARES Act. He said payment protection loans have been given throughout the state to start helping workers stay employed. He added if workers keep their jobs, these loans will be forgiven.

Dr. Kristina Box, commissioner of the Indiana State Dept. of Health, said that on Wednesday (April 15) the drive-thru testing site in Sellersburg will begin testing family members of health care and public safety workers if they are showing symptoms of the coronavirus. Testing began earlier in the week for health care and public safety workers.

During the past 24 hours, the state saw 313 new positive cases, as well as 37 new deaths, which took place between March 15 and April 13. To date, 46,017 Hoosiers have been tested for COVID-19, with 8,527 tests coming back positive.

COVID-19 now in all 92 Indiana counties

The governor’s first update of the week, on April 13, included new data on who has tested positive with COVID-19, which has now spread to all of Indiana’s 92 counties.

The state has 343 deaths, but Dr. Kristina Box estimated some fatalities haven’t been reported due to the Easter holiday weekend.
Box said the latest estimates show Marion County will see the peak of the outbreak first, which is projected to be at the end of April. She added the rest of the state will peak within the first two weeks of May.
There have been 42,489 Hoosiers tested, with 7,928 confirmed positive for COVID-19. When the state breakdowns positive cases by race, 50.1% of the cases are among people who are Caucasian, while they make up 85.1% of the state’s population.
Black or African-American cases make up 18.5% of the state’s positive cases. This makes up a total of 9.8% of the state’s population.
The Indiana State Department of Health says 44% of the state’s ICU beds are available. Indiana’s capacity is 2,960 beds. Among beds in use, 25% are being used for treating patients with the coronavirus and 31% are being used for other medical treatments.
Gov. Eric Holcomb said he is looking at the state’s “stay-at-home” order, which is set to expire in one week, and what kind of changes will be in place. He is expected to have more information regarding his executive order by the end of the week.

State to receive about $3B in federal funds

During the update today (April 10) from Gov. Eric Holcomb and his team, it was announced that the state has created a task force to help administer and account for the federal assistance package that will aid Indiana through the COVID-19 outbreak.

Indiana is expected to receive approximately $3 billion in federal funds through the CARES Act, according to Indiana Office of Management and Budget Director Cris Johnston.
This will include an estimated $250 million in existing programs the state already participates in. This includes FSSA child care block grants and DCS child welfare, USDA programs such as emergency food and WIC programs, and justice assistance grants.
A new program, called the Education Stabilization Fund, will bring the state roughly $500 million.
The largest piece, about $2.4 billion, will help with the necessary costs of treating the public health crisis. These funds cannot replace the revenue the state will lose during this time.
Johnston said the state’s revenues for March were approximately $70 million below what was originally forecasted before the public health crisis began.
Three hundred Hoosiers have now died due to complications from the coronavirus. There were 55 new deaths reported since yesterday, with the majority of them taking place within the past week. An additional 556 people have tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the state’s total cases to 6,907. There have been 35,040 people tested (225 Harrison Countians have been tested).
(Harrison County’s health administrator reported this evening that 54 residents have tested positive for the virus. She also shared that the second local person, an 86-year-old female, has died.)
The highest number of deaths have occurred among Hoosiers between the ages of 50 and 59, totaling 20.6% of the state’s fatalities. Females account for 54.9%.
Beginning next week, further data will become available, breaking down deaths by race.
Also next week, a drive-thru testing clinic will begin taking place in Clark County. The state conducted similar testing in Lake County this week. Health care professionals, first responders and essential workers will be tested if they are showing symptoms of the coronavirus.

Churches urged to remain closed during Easter weekend

An additional 42 fatalities were announced at today’s update (April 9) by Gov. Eric Holcomb. This brings the total number of Hoosier deaths from the COVID-19 outbreak to 245.

To help better track the outbreak, along with the number of people who are testing positive and negative, beginning tomorrow, the Indiana State Department of Health is requiring all testing facilities to report testing data to the state within 24 hours. Dr. Kristina Box said this will help the state better track the rate that people are testing positive.

Box added this will also help report more accurate numbers regarding deaths. She said some of the deaths reported today date back to mid-March, although about 75% were since Sunday.
To help slow the spread of the coronavirus during the Easter weekend, Holcomb and state officials encouraged church buildings and other physical locations of worship to remain closed for the holiday. Services should live stream or hold other virtual services. The minimum number of people required to put these services on should be the only individuals at the worship center and, when those people are not speaking, they should be wearing masks.
Drive-in worship services may be conducted if they meet some conditions. Those include all attendees must stay inside their vehicles at all times and should not physically interact with other staff or other participants. Persons inside the vehicles should be limited to only members of the same household and no one should exit their vehicles, which should be at least nine feet apart.
Communion should not be handed out, but, if it is, it must be pre-packaged.

Hoosiers encouraged to wear masks in public

During today’s update (April 8) with Gov. Eric Holcomb and the COVID-19 task force, it was announced the state had another 30 COVID-19 reported deaths since the day before, bringing the total to 203 Hoosiers. There have been 5,943 patients who have tested positive with the coronavirus among the more than 30,000 people tested statewide.

Dr. Kristina Box said Hoosiers can feel confident they have recovered if someone is asymptomatic for seven days and a minimum of 72 hours free of a fever without aspirin. She encouraged anyone going anywhere where the public might be to wear a mask.

Indiana EMS Medical Director Dr. Michael Kaufmann said residents who call 911 are being asked to meet first responders outside to help limit the possible exposure to getting sick.

As part of the governor’s executive order from April 7, retired and inactive EMS-trained professionals are being asked to help their communities. The order allows these individuals to provide supplemental health care during the COVID-19 pandemic without needing to be reinstated by the state as long as they are working under the supervision of a licensed EMS or other health care professional.

Number of COVID-19 deaths surpass that of state’s average annual flu season

At Gov. Eric Holcomb’s update today (April 7), it was reported an additional 34 Hoosiers have died from COVID-19 since Monday’s update. Dr. Kristina Box said the majority of those people died between April 4 and 6.

Box put the outbreak in perspective now that 173 Hoosiers have died from the coronavirus. She said, on average, Indiana sees between 150 and 160 influenza deaths annually. That number is over a seven-month time period, and the 173 deaths from COVID-19 have taken place since March 16.

The doctor, who said the 34 new deaths is not likely the peak single-day number, encouraged Hoosiers to continue following state and local health officials’ orders.

Next week, the state could start providing numbers on patients who have recovered from the virus and have been discharged from hospitals throughout Indiana.

To date, 5,507 people in Indiana have tested positive for COVID-19. There have been 28,764 Hoosiers tested so far.

Joe McGuinness, commissioner of the Indiana Dept. of Transportation, said he knows Hoosiers have noticed fewer cars are on the road but that does not mean drivers should speed up. He told them to please slow down to further keep everyone safe.

Asked about people crossing state lines, Holcomb said no one should be traveling across state lines unless they are conducting essential business.

Two of the state’s 92 counties — Decatur and Marion— have “warning” travel advisories in place. According to the Indiana Dept. of Homeland Security, at this level individuals are directed to refrain from all travel and comply with necessary emergency measures; cooperate with public officials and disaster services forces in executing emergency operations plans; and obey and comply with lawful direction of properly identified officers.

Twenty-seven are at “watch” levels, while eight are at the lowest level of local travel advisory.

The remaining counties, including Harrison, Crawford, Floyd and Washington, have no advisories issued at this time.

More businesses ordered closed to foot traffic

As part of the Gov. Eric Holcomb’s latest “stay-at-home” order, announced this afternoon (April 6), more retailers have to keep customers outside of the business.

These non-necessity businesses include book stores, florists and craft stores. The statewide order allows these stores to provide online orders, curbside pick up and carry-out options.

Holcomb also shutdown all state parks and state campgrounds. The only Hoosiers who can stay at a campground are folks who live on the campground and have that address listed as their permanent residence.

Fred Payne, the state’s commissioner for Workforce Development, said Hoosiers who have filed for unemployment insurance should start receiving benefits the week of April 20. The commissioner added workers who are self-employed, independent contractors and gig economy workers will qualify for unemployment through the federal stimulus package, but the state needs more time to implement those workers into the state’s filing system. There currently is no date to when those changes will be available.

Benefits can be made retroactive to March 29.

Beginning tomorrow, an additional 100 workers will help file claims for Hoosiers.

The number of COVID-19- related deaths in Indiana is now 139.

To date, 26,191 people have been tested for the virus in the state with 4,944 confirmed cases reported. All but three of Indiana’s 92 counties have at least one confirmed case; Benton, Perry and Pike currently have no reported cases with 35, 44 and nine tests, respectfully, being done in those counties.

The state COVID-19 Data Report, as of April 5, shows Harrison County with 168 tests completed, 38 confirmed cases and one death, and Crawford County with 39 tests completed and six positive cases.

Officials report 44 confirmed COVID-19 cases in HC

The Harrison County Health Dept. confirms 44 total cases of COVID-19 as of today (April 6) in Harrison County residents.

The health department will provide updates as new information becomes available.

Visit the Indiana State Dept. of Health website at in.gov/coronavirus for up-to-date information about COVID-19 in Indiana.

COVID-19 cases in HC at 38

As of this evening (April 5), the Harrison County Health Dept. reports 38 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Harrison County. That’s up from 29 the previous day.

Following updated guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the health department now recommends people cover their mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others. Cloth face coverings should not be placed on children younger than 2, on anyone who has trouble breathing or on anyone who is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

The health department said you could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick.

Persons should not use a face mask meant for health care workers.

Continue to keep about six feet between yourself and others, A face cloth is not a substitute for social distancing, health officials said.

Governor extends ‘stay-at-home order 2 more weeks

Gov. Eric Holcomb said this afternoon (April 3) he will extend the state’s “stay-at-home” order Monday for another two weeks. He said by extending it for shorter periods of time allows the state to make changes if necessary, and some “tweaks” to the order could come Monday.

The state’s public health emergency was also extended, which now lasts through April 20.

Holcomb said President Trump did approve Indiana’s request to declare the state a major disaster area. This will allow Indiana National Guard and Indiana Air National Guard missions regarding COVID-19 to be 100% reimbursable by federal funds.

Starting Saturday, the Indiana National Guard, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and officials with the Indiana State Dept. of Health will begin surveying old hospital wings, large buildings and other facilities that could potentially be used as alternate medical facilities to help with providing care to patients as the number of cases surges.

As of Friday, 102 Hoosiers had died from the coronavirus. It was the state’s biggest jump in the number of reported deaths. Dr. Kristina Box with the ISDH said the new deaths from Friday included people who had died as early as March 19, but those deaths were just reported to the state in the past 24 hours.

HC Health Dept. confirms first COVID-19 death

Dr. Andrew Morton, Harrison County’s health officer, announced this morning (April 3), the first death from COVID-19. The individual was a 38-year-old male from Harrison County.

The man died yesterday at Baptist Hospital East in Louisville, where he had been hospitalized as a COVID-19 patient. He also suffered from underlying medical conditions.

No further information about the patient will be released due to privacy laws.

Health officials stressed again the importance of staying home if you are ill. If you need to seek medical care, call ahead so that your health care provider can take steps to protect others from exposure to COVID-19. COVID-19 is a respiratory illness caused by a novel, or new, coronavirus that has not been previously identified. It is not the same as the type of coronavirus that causes the common cold.

To date, 3,039 Hoosiers have received positive tests for COVID-19.

COVID-19 is most commonly spread from an infected person to others through:

•respiratory droplets released into the air by coughing and sneezing;

•close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands;

•touching an object or surface with the virus on it and then touching your mouth, nose

or eyes before washing your hands; and

•rarely, fecal contamination.

Many people who acquire COVID-19 will have mild symptoms, can self-isolate and do not need to be tested. Older individuals and those with underlying medical conditions are at higher risk for severe illness. The best ways to protect yourself are to wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, avoid touching your face with unwashed hands, avoid close contact with people who are sick, stay home when you’re sick, cover your cough or sneeze and clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

For a list of counties with positive cases, visit the Indiana State Dept. of Health’s COVID-19 website at https://coronavirus.IN.gov. The site’s dashboard is updated daily at 10 a.m. The website also includes guidance and a list of frequently asked questions.

24 HC residents infected with COVID-19

The Harrison County Health Dept. reported this evening (April 2) that the number of Harrison Countians who have tested positive for COVID-19 is at 24.

Health officials continue to monitor this evolving situation and will make further recommendations as necessary. They are working closely with local and state officials to ensure that contacts of the patients are identified and monitored and that all infection control protocols are being followed.

State’s unemployment claims at 146,000

During Thursday’s update, Fred Payne with Indiana’s Department of Workforce Development said more than 146,000 unemployment claims were filed last week. He added he realizes Hoosiers are experiencing longer wait times to talk with someone on his staff, and some folks aren’t able to connect with anybody at all.

He said DWD is hiring extra workers to help with the overload of calls, adding that process began a few weeks ago as anticipation of unemployment claims to rise.

Payne said what was once a record number for a month when it came to unemployment claims is now what DWD is expecting to get weekly during the pandemic.

Gov. Holcomb said he would provide an update to the state’s “stay-at-home” order Friday.

Remainder of school year to be done remotely

Gov. Eric Holcomb today (April 2) signed an executive order requiring all K-12 schools in Indiana to provide instruction via remote learning for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year and outlines options for districts to continue education during the fight against COVID-19.

To complete the school year, all schools previously received a 20-day waiver to reduce the number of required in-person or remote instruction days to 160. Schools must continue to provide instruction via remote learning until they complete either 160 instructional days or at least 20 additional days of remote learning between the date of the executive order (today) and the end of the school year. If a school completes 20 days and falls short of the required 160 instructional days, the Indiana Dept. of Education can waive the difference.

The governor, in conjunction with Superintendent of Public Instruction Dr. Jennifer McCormick, also directed the Indiana State Board of Education to provide flexibility for school corporations for students who are to graduate in 2020.

The executive order also extends teacher licenses expiring between March 1, 2020, and Aug. 31, 2020, until Sept. 1, 2020.

For more information and reaction from local school superintendents, see next week’s newspaper.

State reports 13 new COVID-19 deaths

The Indiana State Dept. of Health announced this morning (April 2) that 474 additional Hoosiers have been diagnosed with COVID-19 through testing at ISDH, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and private laboratories. That brings to 3,039 the total number of Indiana residents known to have the novel coronavirus following corrections to the previous day’s total.

Harrison County currently has 18 reported confirmed cases, and Crawford County’s total remains at one. Only eight of the state’s 92 counties have no confirmed cases recorded at this time.

To date, 78 Hoosiers have died from COVID-19. Deaths are reported based on when data are received by the ISDH and occurred over multiple days.

The ISDH reports it has received results from 16,285 tests, up from 14,375 on Wednesday.

Additional updates about the state’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak may be provided later today.

#INthistogether campaign launched

A new social distancing campaign was announced today (April 1) as part of Gov. Eric Holcomb’s daily COVID-19 update.

Holcomb said the #INthistogether aims to keep Hoosiers healthy and return the state to normal social interaction and business operations. Partnering with the state includes Eli Lilly, Indiana Pacers, Indiana Fever, Indianapolis Colts, Indiana University and Purdue University.

The #INthistogether campaign underscores the urgency of these social distancing tips:

·  Stay home. Right now, staying home is the best way you can help our health care workers and first responders. Essential businesses are still open and everyone can go to grocery stores, the pharmacy and for medical care as needed.

·  Avoid close physical contact. Remember to maintain a safe distance (at least six feet) and keep up healthy hygiene practices, including wash your hands frequently, avoid touching your face, clean and sanitize frequently and cough or sneeze into elbow.

·  If you feel sick. If you have COVID-19 symptoms, call your physician and try to isolate yourself from others in the home.

·  Stay connected with friends and loved ones. There are multiple ways like video conferencing, when available, that allow people to see each other on computers and smartphones. People are also encouraged to write letters and call or text people to check in and connect socially. Try to say hi to neighbors from six feet away.

·  Take care of yourself. That includes your physical health and mental well-being. Staying home does not mean you can’t go for a run or walk as long as you maintain a safe physical distance. Eating well, occasionally turning off the news and a good night’s sleep are important.

·  Support our community. Look for creative ways to virtually give back to your community. Call an elderly neighbor, say hi over the fence, offer virtual tutoring or donate to an organization or community fund, like the Central Indiana Economic Relief Fund.

As of this morning, more than 2,500 Hoosiers have tested positive for COVID-19 and 65 people have died. Positive cases have now been recorded in 83 of the state’s 92 counties.

Holcomb added he would look over the state’s “stay-at-home” order during the next few days and could decide if it will be extended.

State officials report 45 Hoosier COVID-19-related deaths

During the update today (March 31) with Gov. Eric Holcomb, it was announced 45 Hoosiers have now died due to complications from the coronavirus. Indiana State Dept. of Health Commissioner Dr. Kristina Box said those numbers do not reflect that 10 more people have passed away during the past 24 hours; rather, the number of deaths is updated as reports are received.

The latest deaths all occurred during the past 14 days, Box said.

Fred Payne with Indiana Department of Workforce Development said his office is still processing and getting information from the federal government regarding the federal stimulus package and how it can help the unemployed, such as the self-employed and independent contractors. Payne said it could take a couple more weeks to get those answers.

Holcomb said he extended the state’s bars and restaurants to continue only offering “to go” service through 11:59 p.m. on April 6.

While Kentucky’s governor has ordered residents there to not travel to other states, Holcomb said putting a similar order in place for Hoosiers is not part of his current plan.

The state has now tested more than 13,000 people, with about 15% of the tests coming back positive, according to Box, who added more than 11,000 health professionals have asked how they can volunteer.

Plans implemented to establish field hospitals, alternative care sites

Today (Monday, March 30), Gov. Eric Holcomb provided an update to the state’s measures to slow the spread of the coronavirus, which includes sending a letter to President Donald Trump requesting a major disaster declaration for Indiana.

The state total for COVID-19 cases has grown to nearly 1,800 people. Now, more than 11,000 Hoosiers have been tested for the virus. To date, 35 people in Indiana have died, with the closest to Harrison County taking place in Scott County. The state’s first death took place exactly two weeks ago.

Indiana State Dept. of Health Commissioner Dr. Kristina Box said she anticipates the peak number of cases and deaths to take place between the middle of April and the middle of May. However, she added different models that provide estimates do vary.

Much of today’s virtual press conference, done to further promote social distancing, discussed the surge medical officials are anticipating and steps underway to help hospitals and other medical facilities prepare. Box said approximately 60% of the state’s intensive care beds are being used right now.

Families and Social Services Administration Secretary Dr. Jennifer Sullivan said plans have begun to establish field hospitals and alternative care sites that could be set up within 72 hours. The goal is to double the number of beds by turning operating rooms, recovery rooms, non-critical care rooms and outpatient facilities into critical care units.

The governor issued an executive order to further stop elective procedures, which will allow for personal protective equipment to be solely used for medical staff helping COVID-19 patients. The same order temporarily allows retired medical professionals and people still working to become a professional, such as students and physicians who are still receiving training, to practice and help patients who need care. Holcomb said more than 5,300 people have already shown a willingness to help.

The governor added local law enforcement has the decision on whether or not to monitor people regarding the state’s “stay at home” order.

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HC confirmed COVID-19 cases now at 9

The Harrison County Health Dept. just reported that the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the county totals nine.

The health department continues to monitor this evolving situation and will make further recommendations as necessary. It is working closely with local and state officials to ensure that contacts of the patients are identified and monitored and that all infection control protocols are being followed.

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HC health officer mandates closures

Dr. Andrew Morton, Harrison County’s health officer, has mandated the closure of non-essential services as well as golf courses. It also addresses gatherings.

This mandate will go into effect at 9 p.m. today (Friday, March 27),

Morton made the mandate in accordance with the Harrison County Commissioners’ local proclamation 2020-03-25 in an effort to help slow the spread of COVID-19.

Here’s what the mandate applies to:

• All golf courses, golf pro-shops/clubhouses, automobile dealers (with the exception of services), furniture stores, electronic and appliance stores, cosmetic stores, personal care stores, clothing and shoe stores, jewelry stores, sporting goods stores, music shops, book stores, hobby/craft stores, florists, karate schools and in-person auctions.

• No gatherings of any kind inside or out of groups greater than 10, and groups of 10 must maintain 6 feet distance at all times.

Exemptions to this mandate are: auto and appliance repair services, car rentals, home and garden supply dealers, banks, credit unions and other financial services, grocery and markets, liquor stores, pharmacies, gas stations, supercenters, pet stores and curbside and carryout food services. In all these areas, social distancing must take place.

All non-essential services shall remain closed until further notice from the Harrison County Health Dept.

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Statewide COVID-19 cases at 981

Today Gov. Eric Holcomb and other state leaders announced new information regarding the COVID-19 outbreak.

Dr. Kristina Box, the commissioner of the Indiana State Dept. of Health, announced there were now 981 cases of the coronavirus, with 24 deaths. That’s seven new deaths from the day before. None of the deaths are in Harrison County or a neighboring community.

Box said the state health department is now tracking cases by age and gender. The most number of cases amongst Hoosiers is between the ages of 50 and 59, which count for 18% of the state’s cases. She also said 52% of the patients are females.

Joe McGuinness, commissioner of the Indiana Dept. of Transportation, said his staff is working with the health department, the Indiana National Guard and Indiana State Police to transport medical equipment and supplies to hospitals throughout Indiana.

Holcomb said he is proud of Hoosiers who are stepping up financially to help their neighbors and communities. He said he’s heard several stories from “Mister and Misses Anonymous” who have been donating money to charitable causes that help Hoosiers in need. That includes stories of Hoosiers “over tipping” at restaurants and buying gift cards with the intent to not use them now, which will give local business owners money to get through these challenging times.

Holcomb added new information will come out during the weekend, which may or may not be part of a press conference. Starting next week, press conferences will be fully through virtual means to help prevent the spread of the pandemic.

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HC Commissioners extend local emergency declaration

The Harrison County Board of Commissioners signed a new proclamation that expands on a declaration of a local disaster emergency made March 19. The commissioners also extended the local disaster emergency declaration for an additional 30 days.

Among the points made in the new proclamation, signed March 25, are:

• The Harrison County Justice Center, Jail, Court House, Highway Dept. garage, Government Center, EMS facility, Animal Control Facility, Soil & Water office and Solid Waste facility are closed to the general public.

• County employees and elected officials working in the justice center and jail shall continue to have access to them and shall continue to work their regular schedule until further notice.

• The general public shall have limited access to the justice center and courthouse as deemed necessary by the judge of Harrison Superior Court and judge of Harrison Circuit Court to attend essential hearings as directed and scheduled by the judges. Access to the court-related matters shall be limited to the courtrooms and hallways leading to the courtrooms.

• EMS employees and individuals providing emergency medical services shall continue to have access to the facilities and shall continue to work regular schedules until further notice.

• County highway employees shall continue to have access to the highway garage and shall continue to work regular scheduled until further notice.

• The general public will have limited access as scheduled by appointment at the government center. Individuals working in the government center shall continue to have access to the facilities and work regular schedules as determined by their elected officeholder superior or department head.

• Access to the county probation offices shall be left to the discretion of the chief probation officers as deemed necessary and appropriate to carry out the functions of the probation departments.

• Access to the county health department shall be left to the discretion of the county health officer.

• Recycling drop-off sites throughout the county will be open for drop-offs but no drop-offs will be permitted inside the building. Solid Waste employees shall continue to have access to the facilities and shall continue to work regular schedules as possible until further notice.

• Harrison County Animal Control individuals shall continue to have access to the facilities and shall continue to work regular schedules until further notice.

• Employees of the soil and water office shall continue to have access to the facilities and shall continue to work regular schedules as possible until further notice.

• All county offices shall remain open during the facility closure and make any necessary adjustments to provide essential services necessary to the public. The county auditor was instructed to post the telephone numbers for each county office on the entrance of all county buildings, advising the public to call the office if additional assistance is needed by the particular county office.

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Fourth case of COVID-19 confirmed in HC resident

The fourth case of COVID-19 has been confirmed in Harrison County.

According to the Harrison County Health Dept., the confirmed case reports visiting Spring Valley Funeral Home in New Albany on March 23.

Individuals who visited this location at that time are advised to monitor for symptoms of COVID-19 and contact their health care provider if they experience symptoms associated with the virus.

Due to privacy laws, no additional information about the patient will be released, said Carrie Herthel, administrator of the county’s health department.

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HC confirms third case of COVID-19

The Harrison County Health Dept. confirmed today (March 26) the third case of COVID-19. Confirmed case reports visiting the following locations:

• Dr. Bonacum, Corydon Medical Associates on March 23;

• Transformation House at Laconia on March 16 and 17;

• Butterfly House at Laconia on March 16 and 17;

• Sam’s Club in Clarksville on March 16 and 17;

• Kroger in Clarksville on March 16 and 17; and

• Grace Tabernacle near Laconia on March 15 and 16.

“Individuals who visited these locations at that time are advised to monitor for symptoms of COVID-19,” Carrie Herthel, administrator of the Harrison County Health Dept., said. “If you experience symptoms, contact your health care provider and inform them that you have been exposed to COVID-19. This is an ongoing investigation and as more information becomes available we will provide it to the community.”

The health department continues to monitor this evolving situation and will make further recommendations as necessary.

About the newest case, Herthel said, “the patient is currently hospitalized and in critical condition. No additional information about the patient will be released due to privacy laws.”

The Harrison County Health Dept. is working closely with local and state officials to ensure that contacts of the patient are identified and monitored and that all infection control protocols are being followed.

The health department will provide updates as new information becomes available.

Visit the ISDH website at in.gov/coronavirus for the most up-to-date information about COVID-19 in Indiana.

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State’s COVID-19 cases now at 645

Today (March 26), the Indiana State Dept. of Health reported 645 Hoosiers have now tested positive COVID-19. That’s up from 477 from the day before. Three additional deaths have taken place, with the latest cases taking place in Franklin, Jasper and Putnam counties, bringing the total to 17. More than 4,600 people in Indiana have now been tested.

These numbers were reported this afternoon during Gov. Eric Holcomb’s briefing of the coronavirus pandemic.

Also during the briefing, Fred Payne, commissioner of the Indiana Dept. of Workforce Development, said the state saw a record number of unemployment claims — 62,777 — filed in the past week. Payne said Hoosiers filing a claim can expect a check to arrive in approximately 21 days.

Doug Carter, superintendent of the Indiana State Police, reiterated again today that motorists cannot be stopped by law enforcement at any level solely because they are traveling throughout the state.

Among other things, Holcomb said the mandate to have a Real ID for air travel has been extended to September 2021 (the deadline previously had been Oct. 1 of this year).

The governor also announced the Indianapolis 500 has been rescheduled to Sunday, Aug. 23. INDYCAR’s GMR Grand Prix, which was scheduled for May 9, has been moved to Saturday, July 4. That race and the NASCAR Xfinity Series race on the Indianapolis Motor Speedway road course are both scheduled to take place on Independence Day.

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Health Dept. confirms 2nd case of COVID-19 in Harrison Co.

The Harrison County Health Dept. today (March 25) confirms the second case of COVID-19. The confirmed case reports visiting the following locations: Walmart Supercenter in Corydon and Dollar General stores in Central and Corydon between Feb. 27 and March 15 and Colonial Lanes Bowling Alley in Corydon on March 7.

Individuals who visited these locations at those times are advised to monitor for symptoms of COVID-19. If they experience these symptoms, they need to contact their health care provider and inform them of exposure to COVID-19. This is an ongoing investigation and, as more information becomes available, it will provide it to the community.

The county health cepartment continues to monitor this evolving situation and will make further recommendations as necessary.

“We are working closely with the organizations to determine the risk to patrons,” Carrie Herthel, administrator of the county health department, said.

The patient is currently in stable condition and on home quarantine. No additional information about the patient will be released due to privacy laws.

Herthel said the Harrison County Health Dept. is working closely with local and state officials to ensure that contacts of the patient are identified and monitored and that all infection control protocols are being followed.

Visit the ISDH website at in.gov/coronavirus for the most up-to-date information about COVID-19 in Indiana.

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State officials give latest regarding COVID-19

Gov. Eric Holcomb’s update Wednesday afternoon (March 25) about the COVID-19 pandemic also included comments from Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch, Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction Dr. Jennifer McCormick, Indiana State Health Commissioner Dr. Kris Box and Indiana Secretary of Commerce Jim Schellinger.

Box said Indiana had 119 new cases of the coronavirus since Tuesday, March 24, bringing the state’s total to 477 cases. As of Wednesday’s update, 14 people had died from COVID-19, with the state’s two most recent deaths taking place in Hancock and Howard counties.

Holcomb said workers who believe their employer is not an essential business can contact the Indiana Occupational Safety and Health Administration to file a complaint.

McCormick said the Indiana State Dept. of Education and Family and Social Services Administration have teamed together to encourage schools to open on a limited basis to provide child care services for emergency workers and others who are working to keep communities safe during the pandemic. This link provides schools with information about how to open facilities while maintaining a safe environment: https://www.doe.in.gov/sites/default/files/news/child-care-recommendation-essential-personnel.pdf.

Holcomb plans to have daily press conferences each afternoon (expected time is 2:30). Updates will be provided here on this website as they become available.

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