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51 of state’s counties established prior to capital’s move to Indy

Celebrating Statehood
51 of state’s counties established prior to capital’s move to Indy 51 of state’s counties established prior to capital’s move to Indy
Karen Schwartz, Special to The Corydon Democrat

Fifty-one of Indiana’s current 92 counties were established before or during the time Corydon served as the first state capital. The Indiana Torch Relay will pass through all 92 counties, beginning Sept. 9 in Harrison County and finishing Oct. 15 in Marion County.
Here is a chronological listing of those 51 counties, with their date of founding and origin of their name:
‘Knox County, June 20, 1790, named for Gen. Henry Knox, the first United States Secretary of War.
‘Clark County, Feb. 3, 1801, named for Gen. George Rogers Clark, who served in the American Revolutionary War.
‘Dearborn County, March 7, 1803, named for Gen. Henry Dearborn, U.S. Secretary of War.
‘Harrison County, Dec. 1, 1808, named for William Henry Harrison, the first governor of the Indiana Territory and later a U.S. president.
‘Jefferson County, founded Nov. 23, 1810, named for President Thomas Jefferson.
‘Wayne County, Nov. 27, 1810, named for Gen. ‘Mad’ Anthony Wayne, who served in the American Revolutionary War.
‘Franklin County, Feb. 1, 1811, named for Benjamin Franklin.
‘Warrick County, March 9, 1813, named for Capt. Jacob Warrick, who was killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe.
‘Gibson County, April 1, 1813, named for Gen. John Gibson, who served as secretary of the Indiana Territory.
‘Washington County, Dec. 21, 1813, named for President George Washington.
‘Switzerland County, Oct. 1, 1814, named for the nation of Switzerland, home of many of the early settlers.
‘Perry County, Nov. 1, 1814, named for Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, who served in the War of 1812.
‘Posey County, Nov. 1, 1814, named for Thomas Posey, the third territorial governor.
‘Jackson County, Jan. 1, 1816, named for President Andrew Jackson.
‘Orange County, Feb. 1, 1816, named for Orange County, N.C.
‘Daviess County, Feb. 15, 1817, named for Col. Joseph Daviess, who died at the Battle of Tippecanoe.
‘Pike County, Dec. 21, 1816, named for Gen. Zebulon M. Pike, who died in the War of 1812.
‘Jennings County, Dec. 27, 1816, named for Jonathan Jennings, Indiana’s first governor.
‘Ripley County, Dec. 27, 1816, named for Gen. E.W. Ripley, who fought in the War of 1812.
‘Sullivan County, Dec. 30, 1816, named for Gen. Daniel Sullivan, who served in the American Revolutionary War.
‘Dubois County, Dec. 20, 1817, named for Toussaint Dubois, who served under William Henry Harrison.
‘Lawrence County, Jan. 7, 1818, named for Capt. James Lawrence, who served in the War of 1812.
‘Vanderburgh County, Jan. 7, 1818, named for Henry Vanderburgh, a territorial judge.
‘Randolph County, Jan. 10, 1818, named for Thomas Randolph, who was killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe.
‘Spencer County, Jan. 10, 1818, named for Capt. Spier Spencer, who was killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe.
‘Monroe County, Jan. 14, 1818, named for President James Monroe.
‘Vigo County, Jan. 21, 1818, named for pioneer Francis Vigo.
‘Crawford County, Jan. 29, 1818, named for Col. William Crawford, who served in the Indian Wars.
‘Owen County, Dec. 21, 1818, named for Col. Abraham Owen, who was killed in the Battle of Tippecanoe.
‘Fayette County, Dec. 28, 1818, named for Gen. Marquis de la Fayette of France, who fought in the American Revolutionary War.
‘Floyd County, Jan. 2, 1819, named for Col. John Floyd, who served in the War of 1812.
‘Scott County, Jan. 12, 1820, named for Gen. Charles Scott, who fought in the Indian Wars.
‘Martin County, Jan. 17, 1820, named for Maj. John T. Martin of Kentucky, who served in the War of 1812.
‘Wabash County, Jan. 20, 1820, named for the Wabash River.
‘Greene County, Jan. 5, 1821, named for Gen. Nathanael Greene, who fought in the American Revolutionary War.
‘Union County, Jan. 5, 1821, named for the union of states.
‘Bartholomew County, Jan. 8, 1821, named for Gen. Joseph Bartholomew, who was wounded at the Battle of Tippecanoe.
‘Parke County, Jan. 9, 1821, named for Benjamin Parke, a territorial delegate to the U.S. Congress.
‘Decatur County, Dec. 31, 1821, named for Commodore Stephen Decatur, who served in the War of 1812.
‘Henry County, Dec. 31, 1821, named for Patrick Henry.
‘Marion County, Dec. 31, 1821, named for Gen. Francis Marion, who served in the American Revolutionary War.
‘Putnam County, Dec. 31, 1821, named for Gen. Israel Putnam, who served in the American Revolutionary War.
‘Rush County, Dec. 31, 1821, named for Dr. Benjamin Rush, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.
‘Shelby County, Dec. 31, 1821, named for Gen. Isaac Shelby, of the American Revolutionary War.
‘Montgomery County, Dec. 21, 1822, named for Gen. Richard Montgomery, who was killed at Quebec.
‘Johnson County, Dec. 31, 1822, named for John Johnson, an early Indiana Supreme Court judge.
‘Madison County, Jan. 4, 1823, named for President James Madison.
‘Hamilton County, Jan. 8, 1823, named for Alexander Hamilton, who was the first secretary of the Treasury.
‘Allen County, Dec. 17, 1823, named for Col. John Allen, who was killed at the River Raisin massacre.
‘Hendricks County, Dec. 20, 1823, named for Gov. William Hendricks.
‘Vermillion County, Jan. 2, 1824, named for the Vermillion River.
Karen Schwartz, president of the Historical Society of Harrison County, serves on the legacy group of the Harrison County Committee for the Indiana Bicentennial. As part of Indiana’s bicentennial, she is providing a monthly column ‘ focusing on a person, place or event from Harrison County’s history ‘ that gives insight to our history. She said the columns should serve as an introduction and/or summary of a topic but are not intended to include all known facts and information. Schwartz can be contacted at 812-736-2373 or 812-738-2828, by email at [email protected] or by regular mail at 5850 Devil’s Elbow Road NW, Corydon, IN 47112.

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